Introduction to ethics for university undergraduate students

An introduction to ethics

Series of open educational resources openly licensed for your use (CC BY SA unless otherwise stated). This page includes:

  • Screencast part 1
  • Screencast part 2
  • PDF of slides
  • MOCK paperwork (participant information sheet, consent form and ethics checklist).

Part 1

Part 2 


Access to PDF of the slides
Introduction to research ethics SLIDES compressed Oct2013

Supplementary material

MOCK Consent Form October2013

MOCK Ethical Reviewer Form October2013

MOCK Participant Info Sheet October2013

Seek and ye shall find.

BLOG POST FOR:

  • Any student completing coursework essays
  • Students completing research dissertations

Anybody completing more professional research, in depth studies, systematic reviews should seek the help of library services to develop their search strategy. The resources on this page are the types of things I’d teach to new students when tackling an essay for the first time at university, just to give a leg up from looking for stuff on Google.

AIM:
By watching these tutorials you should be able to:

  • Understand what a search strategy is
  • Compile lists of search keywords
  • Conduct searches using Boolean terms
  • Use PUBMED for conducting your searches

Introducing the search strategy
(Go to >> http://www.screenr.com/b6Zs)

Conducting the search
(Go to >>http://www.screenr.com/w6Zs)

Note – this search looked within “all fields” which is useful to do when researching new or small scale areas. This looks at the title, MeSH term, abstract and full paper for those matching keywords.

Conducting the search using the MeSH terms
(Go to >>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dncRQ1cobdc&feature=relmfu)

This video from NCBI (the PUBMED people) shows how to specifically use the MeSH terms. These are “medical subject headings” and when author’s submit papers to journals, they will provide a list of keywords. As noted in the video above, this introduces some variability. The PUBMED cataloguers will look at every publication and the author keywords, and allocate the paper to the medical subject heading or subheading. You will see how exhaustive these lists are by looking at the MeSH page. Using the MeSH as the search field will be a more precise way of searching and essential for large scale subject areas. If you are not finding many results, I’d switch to “all fields”.

NOTES:
Boolean terms used for searching include these below and also a far more exhaustive list as you become more competent.

OR or +
AND
NOT

Web of Knowledge will search PUBMED and a number of other databases (WEB OF SCIENCE, BIOSIS, JOURNAL CITATION REPORTS). The use of keywords and Boolean terms applies in exactly the same way.

Heaps of free student study skills resources!


WOW! 

I was just pulling some resources together for project students to help them get started, and when I searched the web I found this fantastic webpage by Viv Sieber at the University of Surrey. It knocked me dead when I first saw it a few years back at a conference, and it has just knocked me dead again.

Link to Study Skills OER University of Surrey OPEN student skills portal built by Viv Sieber. (CLICK on the image to go and use! Or here is the URL http://libweb.surrey.ac.uk/library/skills/Learningskills.html )

This is a prime example of why universities and colleges SHOULD be using open educational resources (OER) – that is, openly licensed learning materials created by experts that we can all share. Imagine, there are over 100 universities in the UK, and each one this time of year, will be brushing up their learning materials to provide THE SAME introductory information to their new students, and in my case THE SAME “getting started with research” – type information for their project students. That has to be a waste of time and somebody’s money!

About the portal

As you click through the various areas you’ll be connected through to a number of UK universities or a number of open education collaborations that have arisen over the years. This means:

1) The materials (pictures, photographs, animations, video) will all have been copyright checked and openly licensed for your use.

2) All the materials are developed by experts within the UK higher education setting so will be of top quality and you can confidently use it. Remember students, if you ARE just finding information on the internet, you need to appraise the source to ensure it is good quality.

3) As a member of staff (academic, librarian, student support officer), this resource will save you time in preparing identical materials, or at least provide you with an open license so you may be able to repurpose some of it. Do look for the terms of the Creative Commons licenses being used.

But will it be relevant to me, at my university?

On the whole YES! Whenever I use this resource I struggle to find something that I think won’t work for my students. For example, definitions of academic offences and use of referencing systems will be identical between universities, although the REGULATIONS behind them might be different. The IT skills resources all seem to be for the most up-to-date software versions. Things like CV tips and interview skills are all pretty generic.

A big round of applause for the  University of Surrey for compiling and sharing this excellent resource.